What is ghrelin? It is actually also known as the hunger hormone, because it is responsible for telling your body that it is hungry. Dieting and really restrictive eating can actually increase ghrelin production, which will leave you feeling hungrier. But when you fast, though you might struggle in the first few days, you’re actually normalizing ghrelin levels.
Fasting is not a way to be forgiven of your sins, but rather a way to grow closer to God after he has already forgiven your sins. For your sins to be forgiven, cry out to God and ask him for forgiveness. Jesus (God) took the punishment for your sins - past present and future. Ask God to forgive you because of Jesus' sacrifice on the cross and realize you cannot save yourself by fasting or any other way. Only God can save you. Salvation is mercy. It is a free, undeserved gift of grace and love. Meditate on that and on the Bible. Read the book of John.
Yes, you'll be hungry at times—but it's not necessarily overwhelming or constant. "Hunger doesn't seem to get worse as the day goes on, and some of our studies report increased fullness and satisfaction," says Kristin Hoddy, Ph.D., R.D.N., a dietitian in private practice who has researched fasting. "Some subjects remarked that they'd get distracted and 'forget' they were hungry."
An understanding of the physiological effects of fasting began to evolve in the latter part of the 19th century, when some of the first organized studies of fasting were carried out in animals and humans. In the 20th century, as more became known about nutrition and the nutritional requirements of the human body, methods of fasting became increasingly sophisticated, and a wide array of approaches emerged. For example, fasting was used as a treatment and as a form of disease prevention, and it was carried out in various settings (e.g., in a hospital or clinic or at home). Some fasting methods, particularly those applied in the treatment of chronic diseases, lasted more than a month, allowed for the consumption of only water or calorie-free tea, and included exercise and enemas. Other methods, generally referred to as modified fasting, allowed for the intake of 200 to 500 kilocalories per day (daily calorie needs of adults range from about 1,600 to 3,000 kilocalories, depending on sex, age, and activity level) and sometimes included psychological or spiritual therapy; depending on the particular method used, calories usually were in the form of bread, vegetable broth, fruit juice, honey, or milk. Modified fasting was distinguished from a very low-calorie diet, which allowed up to 800 kilocalories per day and typically was aimed at inducing substantial weight loss. Intermittent fasting involved cyclic periods of calorie restriction, such as a 24-hour period of fasting followed by a 24-hour period of regular calorie consumption.
A systematic review of 40 studies found that intermittent fasting was effective for weight loss, with a typical loss of 7-11 pounds over 10 weeks. [2] There was much variability in the studies, ranging in size from 4 to 334 subjects, and followed from 2 to 104 weeks. It is important to note that different study designs and methods of intermittent fasting were used, and participant characteristics differed (lean vs. obese).  Half of the studies were controlled trials comparing the fasting group to a comparison group and/or a control group (either continuous calorie restriction or usual lifestyle), with the other half examining an intermittent fasting group alone. A brief summary of their findings:

This is probably a good time to mention that while I have practiced intermittent fasting consistently for the last year, I'm not fanatical about my diet. I work on building healthy habits that guide my behavior 90% of the time, so that I can do whatever I feel like during the other 10%. If I come over to your house to watch the football game and we order pizza at 11pm, guess what? I don't care that it's outside my feeding period, I'm eating it.
And there are many plans, because there are many schools of thought about what’s considered fasting, what food or drink should be consumed during eating windows, and how long these windows should last. Here are a few of the most common methods: Intermittent fasting means eating normally four or five days a week and consuming minimal calories on two or three nonconsecutive days. Time-restricted eating requires setting a window for consuming food, such as 7 a.m. to 7 p.m, and having nothing but noncaloric liquids the rest of the time. The “fasting mimicking diet” involves eating a small number of calories daily for a specific period of time — say five consecutive days every other month. These protocols all have benefits and drawbacks. One approach may work well for some while being entirely unsustainable for others.
Fasts must be entered and exited with care. To enter a fast, the diet should be gradually lightened over a few days. First, heavy foods such as meats and dairy products should be eliminated for a day or two. Grains, nuts, and beans should then be reduced for several days. The day before a fast, only easily digested foods like fruits, light salads, and soups should be eaten. During the fast, only pure water and occasional herbal teas should be drunk.

A fast for God doesn't have to be all day. It can be one meal. You could choose to give up sugar or caffeine. Fasting for God is sacrificing something that is important to you. Surrendering to God means giving of yourself for Him. We cry out, "All of you, none of me." Fasting tears down strongholds, fasting causes divine power to loose the chains of injustice and sets the captive free. A fast for God ushers in every ministering spirit to go forth on your behalf bringing solutions to every problem. If you want to see God's power working in your life, then fast.
^ Jump up to: a b c Harris, L; Hamilton, S; Azevedo, LB; Olajide, J; De Brún, C; Waller, G; Whittaker, V; Sharp, T; Lean, M; Hankey, C; Ells, L (February 2018). "Intermittent fasting interventions for treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis". JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports. 16 (2): 507–547. doi:10.11124/JBISRIR-2016-003248. PMID 29419624.
On its web site, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics says that although there is evidence that intermittent fasting diets may help prevent chronic disease, more research is needed. It doesn't recommend the diet because "it is not a realistic long-term solution.” The academy also notes that "any variation of fasting may make a person irritable, cause daytime sleepiness/sleeplessness at night, and can even lead to dehydration."
If you haven't met someone who's into intermittent fasting (IF), that's likely to change pretty soon. As one of the biggest diet trends in 2018, people who swear by IF say it has helped them lose weight and accelerate fat loss, gain muscle, and feel healthier overall. Although the idea behind this controversial eating plan isn't exactly a new one—it was used in the early 1900s to treat disorders such as diabetes and epilepsy—it's been gaining traction with dieters today with new intermittent fasting methods such as The Fast Diet (aka the 5:2 program) and the 16:8 method. But what is intermittent fasting exactly—and how can you use it to help you lose weight?
Again, I wouldn't say intermittent fasting is for everyone, but it has made a big difference in my life. It has allowed me to feel in control of my relationship with food and less anxious about it in general, which is always a good thing. I feel more energetic, I'm continuing to lose weight, and I generally feel amazing. I'll definitely be doing intermittent fasting for the foreseeable future.
This is a type of spiritual fasting. Based off of Daniel’s experiences in the Bible’s Book of Daniel, the Daniel Fast is a partial fast where vegetables, fruits and other healthy whole foods are featured prominently, but meat, dairy, grains (unless they’re sprouted ancient grains) and drinks like coffee, alcohol and juice are avoided. Most people follow this fast for 21 days in order to experience a spiritual breakthrough, have more time to reflect on their relationship with God or just to feel closer to what Daniel would have experienced in his time.
Carbs are only problematic when eaten excessively, beyond what your body requires. As long as you are eating low calories then carb intake will make very little difference in respect to fat loss. In other words, two diets of equal calories with varying levels of carb intake will result in the same level of fat loss. If you are still unsure then you can read this brilliant article by Lyle McDonald, Low Carbohydrate Diets Have No Metabolic Advantage. In addition, carbs in the main meal serve very important functions such as increasing leptin (improved satiety and metabolic rate), refilling depleted muscle glycogen stores and triggering the release of serotonin which will improve your quality of sleep and make you feel good.
Because we don't enter the fasted state until 12 hours after our last meal, it's rare that our bodies are in this fat burning state. This is one of the reasons why many people who start intermittent fasting will lose fat without changing what they eat, how much they eat, or how often they exercise. Fasting puts your body in a fat burning state that you rarely make it to during a normal eating schedule.
Most of us have contemplated going on a diet. When we find a diet that appeals to us, it seems as if it will be a breeze to do. But when we get into the nitty gritty of it, it becomes tough. For example, I stay on a low–carb diet almost all the time. But if I think about going on a low–fat diet, it looks easy. I think about bagels, whole wheat bread and jelly, mashed potatoes, corn, bananas by the dozen, etc. — all of which sound appealing. But were I to embark on such a low–fat diet I would soon tire of it and wish I could have meat and eggs. So a diet is easy in contemplation, but not so easy in the long–term execution.
The best long-term diets, no matter what their rules entail, are the ones that are least difficult to maintain—and again, in this regard, intermittent fasting isn’t inherently superior to anything else. “Are you making changes in your behavior? Have you learned positive habits so that when you go back to not fasting, you’re going to be a healthier eater?” Sasson asks. “I know people who fast because they think, Okay, I’m going to be really bad and overdrink or overeat, and then two days a week I’m going to have a clean life, and that’s just not how it works.”
A diagnostic fast refers to prolonged fasting from 8–72 hours (depending on age) conducted under observation to facilitate the investigation of a health complication, usually hypoglycemia. Many people may also fast as part of a medical procedure or a check-up, such as preceding a colonoscopy or surgery. Fasting may also be part of a religious ritual.
×