Another type of intermittent fasting, alternate day fasting has you severely restricting the amount of calories you eat during fasting days, then eating to your stomach’s content on non-fasting days. Food isn’t completely off the table, but you’ll stick to about 25 percent of your normal caloric intake. Someone eating 2,000 calories would cut back to 500, for example. Alternate-day fasting isn’t necessarily a long-term plan, because it can become difficult to stick to, but it can be helpful to get a healthy habit in motion.

You can theoretically eat whatever you want when you're on an IF plan (and not in the fasting phase), but if you overdo the carbs, you'll have trouble keeping your blood sugar stable. Refined carbs, in particular, make your blood sugar rise and your insulin spike and crash. So if you're trying to go without food for longer periods and your diet is too carb-heavy, you're going to end up pretty hungry and irritable.
I know people who say they go without television or movies, and they call these "fasting" times. I'm not opposed to that definition of fasting-fasting does imply that we are giving up one thing in order to replace it with something else, and in the Bible sense, specifically to replace it with prayer. But in the main, I believe fasting has to do with our abstaining from food. Second, biblical fasting is linked with serious seasons of prayer. The more seriously we approach prayer and fasting, the more serious the results we will experience.

Fasting is important, more important perhaps, than many of us have supposed . . . when exercised with a pure heart and a right motive, fasting may provide us with a key to unlock doors where other keys have failed; a window opening up new horizons in the unseen world; a spiritual weapon of God’s provision, mighty, to the pulling down of strongholds. [Arthur Wallis, God’s Chosen Fast].

And there are many plans, because there are many schools of thought about what’s considered fasting, what food or drink should be consumed during eating windows, and how long these windows should last. Here are a few of the most common methods: Intermittent fasting means eating normally four or five days a week and consuming minimal calories on two or three nonconsecutive days. Time-restricted eating requires setting a window for consuming food, such as 7 a.m. to 7 p.m, and having nothing but noncaloric liquids the rest of the time. The “fasting mimicking diet” involves eating a small number of calories daily for a specific period of time — say five consecutive days every other month. These protocols all have benefits and drawbacks. One approach may work well for some while being entirely unsustainable for others.
Perhaps most importantly, intermittent fasting is one of the simplest strategies we have for taking bad weight off while keeping good weight on because it requires very little behavior change. This is a very good thing because it means intermittent fasting falls into the category of “simple enough that you'll actually do it, but meaningful enough that it will actually make a difference.”
I’ll share some of my experiences, now doing heavy strength training for 3 years in a fasted state: For my first “fasted” workout or two after starting an IF protocol, it was very weird to not eat before training. However, after a few sessions, I learned that my body could certainly function (and even thrive) during my training sessions despite not eating a pre-workout meal.
Hi Adrian. I hope all is well with you. I was referred to subscribe to your channel last night and I did. Well, not sure where to start BUT... I have been on my journey with weight loss for a while now and on April 16th of this year I decided to try intermittent fasting. I broke my fast a few times the first week but after that I have been doing well, going to the gym and working out 4-5 days a week doing mostly cardio. From what I've been reading and seeing about IF, people are losing 5-8 lbs a week. Me? I've only lost 4.7 lbs. I am happy for the 4.7lbs down but I was thinking that being the weight that I started (245.4 lbs) would mean I would lose the weight faster. No? I also am watching what I eat via MyFitnessPal to help me count my calories. I usually east between 1200 - 1450 calories. There are days that I have eaten a little less but not much. Also I am 5'1. Please help me because I am discouraged and frustrated doing all I think is right with IF but not seeing the maximum results as people have mentioned. What do you think may be the issue here? Also there is nothing wrong with me medically to say that's the reason I am not losing much weight. I hope to hear from you because I really don't want to give up. I am trying to be healthy! Thank you. (I also sent this message to you on YouTube. Not sure which messages you check more frequently).
Pope Pius XII had initially relaxed some of the regulations concerning fasting in 1956. In 1966, Pope Paul VI in his apostolic constitution Paenitemini, changed the strictly regulated Roman Catholic fasting requirements. He recommended that fasting be appropriate to the local economic situation, and that all Catholics voluntarily fast and abstain. In the United States, there are only two obligatory days of fast – Ash Wednesday and Good Friday. The Fridays of Lent are days of abstinence: eating meat is not allowed. Pastoral teachings since 1966 have urged voluntary fasting during Lent and voluntary abstinence on the other Fridays of the year. The regulations concerning such activities do not apply when the ability to work or the health of a person would be negatively affected.
A mere five years ago, skipping meals was a top diet taboo. Now it's the core of an increasingly popular (and increasingly research-backed) weight-loss approach. Intermittent fasting—periodically eating very little—is not only not bad for you, it may lower blood glucose levels and insulin resistance and reduce inflammation and cardiovascular risk. Why? How? Theories abound, but some experts believe fasting puts your cells under mild stress, just as exercise taxes your muscles and heart, ultimately strengthening them and making them more resistant to disease.
I know many of you are itching to get started right away, but IF is not for everyone. It is not recommended for pregnant women, women who are breastfeeding, people with diabetes, or other people who need to closely regulate their blood sugar. In addition, there has not been research on participants who are underweight, very old, or very young (<18 yrs. old) and these populations could be at higher risk for experiencing negative consequences of fasting (Longo and Mattson , 2014). So please:

This mirrored some of what researchers were finding in non-human primates. Rhesus monkeys share 93 percent of their genetic makeup with humans and usually live to about 26 in captivity. In one study on 76 rhesus monkeys that’s been running since 1989 at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, monkeys on a 30 percent calorie cut lived, on average, two to three years longer than control monkeys. Another ongoing study, started in 1987 by the National Institute on Aging on 121 rhesus monkeys, hasn’t detected the same boost to longevity. But CR has worked remarkably well for the 10 males that started the diet later in life. At least four have lived past age 40, including one to 43 — a record for the species.

Even though this plan is advanced, it's very simple. Don't eat anything every other day. This is the most intense form of fasting but can produce amazing results. Every other day, eat healthy fats, clean meat sources, vegetables, and some fruit, and then on your fasting days, you can consume water, herbal tea, and moderate amounts of black coffee or tea.


The other factors to consider with this diet are more concerned with your current weight. Lower calorie intake for most people will equal less fat. This is because, unless you’re a full-time athlete, most people do not need the number of calories they consume each day. They don’t burn that energy away, and as a result, it turns into fat. The 5:2 diet promotes lower calories on a weekly basis and high nutrient foods during the fasting days.
Keep in mind; the purpose of a fast is to draw closer to The Lord. You are setting aside a specific time to fill up with more of God. It’s not a competition; don’t overthink it. Jesus lived as one of us for over thirty years, and fasted often. He understands what you’re going through. Matthew tells about one of Jesus’ fasts in Matthew 4:2, “After fasting forty days and forty nights, he was hungry” (NIV). This happened just before Jesus was tempted in the desert and then started His full-time ministry. Don’t underestimate the power of taking a step closer to God.
Fasts must be entered and exited with care. To enter a fast, the diet should be gradually lightened over a few days. First, heavy foods such as meats and dairy products should be eliminated for a day or two. Grains, nuts, and beans should then be reduced for several days. The day before a fast, only easily digested foods like fruits, light salads, and soups should be eaten. During the fast, only pure water and occasional herbal teas should be drunk.
It’s a good idea to weigh yourself before starting (and then again at the same time each week), and also to take chest, waist and hip measurements. The rate that you’ll lose depends on your age, levels of activity and your own body – so don’t be disheartened if you’re losing a pound a week while others are losing five or more. Typically weight loss will be faster at the beginning of the diet, and for those with a lot of weight to lose to reach a healthy weight (see this calculator to find out what a healthy weight - or BMI - is for someone of your height and weight).
The purpose in fasting for God is not about giving up food; it is about removing the obstacles that get in the way of fully focusing on Him. Human beings are conditioned to eat, usually 3 meals a day and snacks. We are so focused on what we are going to eat next, we leave very little room in our minds for thinking about God. Removing the food will free up your mind so you can meditate on God.
For Roman Catholics, fasting, taken as a technical term, is the reduction of one's intake of food to one full meal (which may not contain meat on Ash Wednesday and Fridays throughout Lent) and two small meals (known liturgically as collations, taken in the morning and the evening), both of which together should not equal the large meal. Eating solid food between meals is not permitted. Fasting is required of the faithful between the ages of 18 and 59 on specified days. Complete abstinence of meat for the day is required of those 14 and older. Partial abstinence prescribes that meat be taken only once during the course of the day. Meat is understood not to include fish or cold-blooded animals.
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