Thanks for bringing this to our attention, I believe Muslims are urged to fast entirely, whereas the fasting diet plan or 5:2 diet allows people to eat and drink a small amount of food throughout the day. Having said this if this is something you have been doing your entire life perhaps you have some great tips you can share that makes fasting easier?
To begin, you may wish to try spending about 1 week, or so, eating smaller meals and abstaining from sugary foods and caffeine to prepare yourself for total fasting. The 2 days before you begin your actual fast, you might eat only fruits and vegetables, while drinking only water. This will prepare your appetite (physically) and your mind for going without your favorite foods.
AN IMPORTANT CAVEAT: Intermittent Fasting can be more complex for people who have issues with blood sugar regulation, suffer from hypoglycemia, have diabetes, etc. If you fit into this category, check with your doctor or dietitian before adjusting your eating schedule. It also affects women differently (there’s a whole section dedicated to that below)
Based on my experience, 24-hour fasts will get me into ketosis much faster than other methods like the fat fasting technique. To make the fast easier, I generally start my fast about 3–4 hrs before I go to bed the night before your full day fast. That means if I am going to fast all day Sunday, I start the fast on Saturday night right after my final meal. That way when I wake up, I am 11–12 hrs into my fast.
Intermittent fasting is hard in the contemplation, of that there is no doubt. “You go without food for 24 hours?” people would ask, incredulously when we explained what we were doing. “I could never do that.” But once started, it’s a snap. No worries about what and where to eat for one or two out of the three meals per day. It’s a great liberation. Your food expenditures plummet. And you’re not particularly hungry. … Although it’s tough to overcome the idea of going without food, once you begin the regimen, nothing could be easier.”
Researchers have demonstrated that fasting counteracts a variety of ailments including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and even diminishing cognition but these findings were based on studies of rats and other laboratory animals where the researcher controlled the animal’s fast. Even if fasting was as beneficial for humans as it is for rats and mice, the reality is that most of us don’t like to be hungry and there’s no researcher to enforce the fast. 
Pray before your fast. Pray, confessing every one of your sins, and inviting the Holy Spirit to lead your life. Let Jesus know you wish to know Him personally. Acknowledge that He lived without sin, died in our place, on the cross for our sins and rose 3 days later, freeing us from condemnation, and giving us His free gift of eternal life. Humble yourself to ask forgiveness from everyone you have hurt; ask forgiveness from God. Forgive those who have hurt you. You do not want to enter into a fast holding grudges, carrying envy, pride, anger or hurt. The enemy will try to use those things to distract you from your fast.
Christian fasting is more than denying ourselves food or something else of the flesh - it's a sacrificial lifestyle before God. In Isaiah 58, we learn what a "true fast" is. It's not just a one-time act of humility and denial before God, it's a lifestyle of servant ministry to others. As Isaiah tells us, fasting encourages humility, loosens the chains of injustice, unties the chords of the yoke, frees the oppressed, feeds the hungry, provides for the poor, and clothes the naked. This concept of fasting isn't a one day thing - it's a lifestyle of servant living for God and others.
Fasting isn’t merely an act of self-deprivation, but a spiritual discipline for seeking more of God’s fullness. Which means we should have a plan for what positive pursuit to undertake in the time it normally takes to eat. We spend a good portion of our day with food in front of us. One significant part of fasting is the time it creates for prayer and meditation on God’s word or some act of love for others.

What if we told you that the answer to losing weight, improving body composition, and feeling better isn’t about dieting, but instead skipping meals every once in a while? For some, intermittent fasting, or going a longer period of time — usually between 14 and 36 hours — with few to no calories, can be a lot easier than you may think. And the benefits might be worth it. If you think about it, all of us “fast” every single day — we just call it sleeping. Intermittent fasting just means extending that fasting period, and being a bit more conscious of your eating schedule overall. But is it right for you? And which method is best?


Classical Pentecostalism does not have set days of abstinence and lent, but individuals in the movement may feel they are being directed by the Holy Spirit to undertake either short or extended fasts. Although Pentecostalism has not classified different types of fasting, certain writers within the movement have done so. Arthur Wallis writes about the "Normal Fast" in which pure water alone is consumed.[75] The "Black Fast" in which nothing, not even water, is consumed is also mentioned. Dr. Curtis Ward points out that undertaking a black fast beyond three days may lead to dehydration, may irreparably damage the kidneys, and result in possible death.[76] He further notes that nowhere in the New Testament is it recorded that anyone ever undertook a black fast beyond three days and that one should follow this biblical guideline. Dr. Herbert Shelton advises that one should drink water according to natural thirst.[77] In addition to the Normal Fast and the Black Fast, some undertake what is referred to as the Daniel Fast (or Partial Fast) in which only one type of food (e.g., fruit or fruit and non-starchy vegetables) is consumed.[75] In a Daniel Fast, meat is almost always avoided, in following the example of Daniel and his friends' refusal to eat the meat of Gentiles, which had been offered to idols and not slaughtered in a kosher manner. In some circles of Pentecostals, the term "fast" is simply used, and the decision to drink water is determined on an individual basis. In other circles profuse amounts of pure water is advised to be consumed during the fasting period to aid the cleansing of internal toxins. Most Pentecostal writers on fasting concur with Dr. Mark Mattson who says that sensible intermittent fasting with a sensible water intake can strengthen the organism and assist thwarting degenerative diseases.[78]
If the better part of wisdom for you, in your health condition, is not to go without food, consider fasting from television, computer, social media, or some other regular enjoyment that would bend your heart toward greater enjoyment of Jesus. Paul even talks about married couples fasting from sex “for a limited time, that you may devote yourselves to prayer” (1 Corinthians 7:5).

On its web site, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics says that although there is evidence that intermittent fasting diets may help prevent chronic disease, more research is needed. It doesn't recommend the diet because "it is not a realistic long-term solution.” The academy also notes that "any variation of fasting may make a person irritable, cause daytime sleepiness/sleeplessness at night, and can even lead to dehydration."
The four-hour eating window — which Hofmekler refers to as the “overeating” phase — is at night in order to maximize the Parasympathetic Nervous System’s ability to help the body recuperate, promoting calm, relaxation and digestion, while also allowing the body to use the nutrients consumed for repair and growth. Eating at night may also help the body produce hormones and burn fat during the day, according to Hofmekler. During these four hours, the order in which you eat specific food groups matters, too. Hofmelker says to start with veggies, protein and fat. After finishing those groups, only if you are still hungry should you tack on some carbohydrates.
Zero-calorie beverages are okay.  I drink green tea in the morning for my caffeine kick while writing. If you want to drink water, black coffee, or tea during your fasted period, that’s okay.  Remember, don’t overthink it – keep things simple! Dr. Rhonda Patrick over at FoundMyFitness believes that a fast should stop at the first consumption of anything other than water, so experiment yourself and see how your body responds.

I hope this encourages someone. This morning I got into an argument with someone. (that isn't the encouraging part of course) I became so discouraged and did not want to go to my office and try to talk with God about anything at that point. And I wanted a cup of coffee but tried to stay away. Finally I felt the Lord say to me that if a cup of coffee was going to keep me from spending time with Him then have the cup of coffee. I made my cup, went to my office and logged into pastor Jentezen's blog. And I cried and cried. I just couldn't pray but I could listen. I clicked on his sermon, "Right People, Right Place, Right Plan" and God said some of the sweetest and most encouraging things in that sermon. Please stick to and fight through your fast but don't let anything you feel is a slip up keep you from what's really important. If I had let that cup of coffee make me feel unworthy of seeing God this morning then I would have been out of the biggest blessing of hearing His Words to me.

7. Are you craving foods? Paying attention to your relationship with food during fasting is helpful to assess what’s working and what isn’t to build longer-term habits. For example, having a sweet tooth may be a major issue for you typically, but avoiding sugar and restricting calories may change things. Or maybe you notice you are craving greens or meat or another food. This may be from eliminating so many foods that the body is missing certain nutrients.

Also, for many people, a full 16 hours of fasting just isn’t realistic, says Cynthia Sass, a New York City– and L.A.-based performance nutritionist. She recommends 12 hours of overnight fasting at most and believes the 16-hour gap is especially tough on those who exercise early in the morning or late at night. “If fasting makes you feel miserable and results in intense cravings and rebound overeating, it's not the right path for you,” she says.

Again, I wouldn't say intermittent fasting is for everyone, but it has made a big difference in my life. It has allowed me to feel in control of my relationship with food and less anxious about it in general, which is always a good thing. I feel more energetic, I'm continuing to lose weight, and I generally feel amazing. I'll definitely be doing intermittent fasting for the foreseeable future.
Hi, I posted yesterday and my results are in after 4 days. I started the week at 140lbs and I’m now at 134lbs – 135lbs. I eat between 1500 – 1800 and walk every day 45 minutes. I weight trained on Tuesday and Wednesday, cardio Thursday, weight train again today with cardio(Friday). Only for 45 minutes per session – I can’t afford much time on my lunch hours. More details for you women out there who are mothers and who work full time: start with walking 30 minutes a day, fast pace.
For beginners, fasting is not easy my mind is constantly battling food thoughts due to various reasons. I am daily taking a good vitaman/mineral/potassium . 2 Fiber tablets which work very good considering I have not had any food all week. When I feel hungry pains I have 1/2 protein drink, at night i sip on peppermint tea. STAY ENCOURAGED STAY FOCUSED on CHRIST
Hi I just started OMAD or 24-HIIT fasting. But I found myself eating more calories than eating 3 meals a day, I used to eat around 1300cal per day but now around 1500cal. I wonder if I’ll gain weight this way. I read some articles and they said if I start eating at dinner time, I should just eat the amount I usually eat for dinner like 500cal. I wonder if that is right.

Jesus was teaching that after His departure, the entire dynamic would change and the disciples would need a different type of preparation and provision. Fasting was to be a vital part of this new preparation. The new covenant is based on the truth that we have received everything in Christ, “Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in the heavenly realms with every spiritual blessing in Christ” (Ephesians 1:3).
Study after study confirms that any form of intermittent fasting will help reduce weight and improve body composition, though the results are probably about the same as you’d see from restricting your calories. One study Varady ran, published in 2017 in JAMA Internal Medicine, found that after dieting for one year, people lost about 5–6% of their bodyweight whether they restricted their calories or tried alternate-day fasting.
The main benefit of intermittent fasting is weight loss—fat loss, specifically. “Insulin increases when you eat, and when insulin is high, you cannot burn fat. When you fast, insulin falls, which allows your body to access its stores of food (i.e., body fat) for energy,” explains Jason Fung, M.D., a Toronto-based nephrologist and author of The Complete Guide to Fasting.
In a paper published in 2002 on the pseudo-experiment, Walford and colleagues reported that the Biosphere staff had been in excellent health. Nearly all of them lowered their blood pressure, blood sugar, cholesterol and other health measures. Still, their skeletal appearance was shocking. “They were malnourished, and they didn’t look healthy,” says Eric Ravussin, a metabolic researcher at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
If you're worried you’ll be starving while fasting, you’ll be pleasantly surprised! Intermittent fasting decreases your hunger hormone ghrelin, which in turn can increase dopamine levels in the brain. (Just another example of the gut-brain axis at work.) Fasting can also help free people from emotional eating and kill cravings by transitioning your metabolism from unstable sugar-burning to steady fat-burning.
Another perk? There are no “forbidden foods,” and no counting calories, weighing food or restricting your diet, which makes it a bit easier to follow. That said, this isn’t a free-for-all. “You still have to eat like a grown-up,” Pilon says. It’s all about moderation: You can still eat whatever you want, but maybe not as much of it. (A slice of birthday cake is OK, he says, but the whole cake isn’t.)
Fasting should not be considered a "dieting method" either. We shouldn't fast to lose weight, but rather to gain deeper fellowship with God. Yes, anyone can fast. Some may not be able to fast from food (diabetics, for example), but everyone can temporarily give up something in order to focus on God. Even unplugging the television for a period of time can be an effective fast.

A healthy diet is always the key to a healthy lifestyle. It’s especially important to eat healthy if you are fasting; even though you’re eating less, you still need to take in the essential vitamins, minerals, and nutrients your body needs to function . Try to get the recommended servings of fruits and vegetables, as well as protein and grains, into your daily diet.


Often, the major argument for periodic caloric restriction is that we did not evolve to eat three meals a day, every day. Some fasting proponents argue that our bodies were designed to be able to run on little or no food for as long as several weeks or even months. After all, we didn’t have access to a steady food supply until the advent of agriculture, and it wasn’t until the neolithic revolution that humans adopted a more regular meal pattern.
“…a progression should be observed in your fasting, especially if this discipline is new to you and you are unfamiliar with its physical effects. Don’t start out with a weeklong water fast! Begin by skipping one meal each day for two to three days and setting aside the money it would have cost to give to the poor. Spend the time praying that you would have used for eating."
Another aspect of fasting for God is comparable to a person dedicating an action to a cause. For God and country was, at one time, a familiar declaration in the United States.  It implied that the action being taken was to answer a noble call and serve a higher motive, the expectation of reward or compensation being far removed. The motivation came from a spiritual, emotional and dedicated commitment to do what is right. Similarly, a fast may be undertaken for God because it represents a lofty act, a selfless commitment to an act considered meritorious and virtuous.

Hello Adrian, my name is Rita. I am 61 years old and just retired from 30 years of teaching! The last 12 years I taught 3rd grade! I have gained weight and become very depressed! I am 5'4" and weigh 208 pounds! Terribly obese! I have just been diagnosed with sleep apnea, and I take blood pressure meds! (And antidepressants) Please help! I use to be energetic and a lot of fun! I would love for my husband of 37 years to find me desirable again! Please tell me how I should start to see quick results! I would like to weigh 135 pounds, which is 73 pounds to lose! Is this possible? I am desperate!😧 but lack motivation! After reading your articles, I am ready to try! Thanks for hearing me out! Your guidance on how I should begin will be greatly appreciated! With gratitude, Rita from Mississippi!


You'll probably lose weight on the Fast Diet because you’ll consume significantly fewer calories than you normally would on two days of the week. If you actually stick with the plan, you'll steadily drop weight. And because the two fast days are nonconsecutive and allow for at least some eating, the diet authors have found that people don't typically binge and overeat on the nonfasting days.

I’m 65 and I retired recently. I tried this for one week, and I must admit I particularly watched the clock all day long. I was very intergetic, and my depression subsided most of the time. At one week I weight myself, and thought why am I doing this if I’m not losing weight? So I went off and now I feel like I drag most of the day. I’m getting back on…enough said.

The sense of "living an unrestrained life" (usually of women) is from 1746 (fast living is from 1745). Fast buck recorded from 1947; fast food is first attested 1951. Fast-forward first recorded 1948. Fast lane is by 1966; the fast track originally was in horse-racing (1934); figurative sense by 1960s. To fast talk someone (v.) is recorded by 1946.


These words are so uplifting to me in my journey. God is great all the time. Thank you! I pray that everyone is lifted up on this journey. I am blessed and I feel blessed. It feels great to be on this journey. The body feels good. The mind feels good. The Holy Spirit is at work in me and within me. Like the pastor says: Stay on course. Don't be defeated by the spirit of failure. God loves YOU. If you are here, it's because God drew you here to be uplifted. Stay on track. Blessings to all of you today and beyond!
While these five methods are the most well-known in terms of integrating periods of fasting into your eating schedule, there are many other similar philosophies based on meal timing. For those who prefer a more fluid, less rigid method, there’s also the concept of eating intuitively. Primal Diet proponent Mark Sisson is a supporter of the Eat WHEN (When Hunger Ensues Naturally) method, where dieters simply eat whenever their bodies ask them to. However, some believe this can also lead to overeating or overconsumption of calories, since our bodies’ hunger-induced choices may be more caloric than otherwise.

Never forget that the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil was the knowledge of good and evil. There was an element of good in that fruit, not just evil. The devil told Eve specifically that the fruit of the tree was "good for food, and that it was pleasant to the eyes" (Gen. 3:6). All Eve had to do was look to see that the fruit was pleasant. She made a bad assumption, however, that what was visually pleasant would also be "good for food." In that, the devil was very wrong!

Another aspect of fasting for God is comparable to a person dedicating an action to a cause. For God and country was, at one time, a familiar declaration in the United States.  It implied that the action being taken was to answer a noble call and serve a higher motive, the expectation of reward or compensation being far removed. The motivation came from a spiritual, emotional and dedicated commitment to do what is right. Similarly, a fast may be undertaken for God because it represents a lofty act, a selfless commitment to an act considered meritorious and virtuous.


^ Guéranger, Prosper; Fromage, Lucien (1912). The Liturgical Year: Lent. Burns, Oates & Washbourne. p. 8. St. Benedict's rule prescribed a great many fasts, over and above the ecclesiastical fast of Lent; but it made this great distinction between the two: that whilst Lent obliged the monks, as well as the rest of the faithful, to abstain from food till sunset, these monastic fasts allowed the repast to be taken at the hour of None.
As an expression of lamentation and/or penitence, fasting nearly always is associated with weeping ( Judges 20:26 ; Esther 4:3 ; Psalm 69:10 ; Joel 2:12 ), confession ( 1 Sam 7:6 ; Dan 9:3 ), and the wearing of sackcloth ( 1 Kings 21:27 ; Neh 9:1 ; Esther 4:3 ; Psalm 69:10 ; Dan 9:3 ). In the New Testament Jesus chides the hypocritical Pharisees for disfiguring their faces when they fast ( Matt 6:16-18 ), a reference no doubt to the custom of smearing themselves with ashes. These objects and actions had no intrinsic penitential value but in a culture in which inner feelings were commonly displayed or even dramatized, when done sincerely they effectively communicated contrition. It became easy, however, for the outward exhibition of repentance to take the place of a genuine, inner attitude and thus become an act of hypocrisy.
Martin Luther, founder of the Lutheran Churches, held that fasting served to "kill and subdue the pride and lust of the flesh".[63] As such, the Lutheran churches often emphasized voluntary fasting over collective fasting, though certain liturgical seasons and holy days were times for communal fasting and abstinence.[64][65] Certain Lutheran communities advocate fasting during designated times such as Lent,[37][66] especially on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday.[39][37][67][68] A Handbook for the Discipline of Lent delineates the following Lutheran fasting guidelines:[69]
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