Lisa Jubilee, MS, CDN, co-founder of Living Proof Pilates in New York City, who follows time-restricted eating herself, believes that IF has multiple benefits for many people, though there are specific groups who should steer clear or work closely with a doctor. How do you know which camp you fall into? When in doubt, consult your doctor or dietitian. But here are some intermittent fasting benefits that can help you decide whether this eating plan is right for you.

DU: There are different kinds of fasting. Scientifically speaking, ‘fasting’ can be caloric restriction, intermittent fasting, or dietary restriction. Caloric restriction is simply cutting down your energy intake by 20 to 40 percent. Intermittent fasting involves forgoing food completely for a period of time, say morning till evening, and then eating normal meals the next day or so. Dietary restriction is limiting or eliminating a particular macronutrient from one’s meal, say proteins or carbohydrates, for a season.
In a physiological context, fasting may refer to the metabolic status of a person who has not eaten overnight, or to the metabolic state achieved after complete digestion and absorption of a meal. Several metabolic adjustments occur during fasting. Some diagnostic tests are used to determine a fasting state. For example, a person is assumed to be fasting once 8–12 hours have elapsed since the last meal. Metabolic changes of the fasting state begin after absorption of a meal (typically 3–5 hours after eating).
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